The Danish Manor Houses online 

The Research Centre’s mapping projects

In recent years the Danish Research Centre for Manorial Studies has been working to compile and disseminate knowledge of manor houses in the landscape and of Denmark as a manorial landscape. View the Centre’s collection of digital manorial maps here (Danish site).

Today we have a great deal of material and a substantial overall knowledge of Danish manor houses, their stories and their influential interaction with landscape and society. To a large extent, however, this knowledge is diffuse and uncoordinated when it comes to ordinary, interested users. That is why, in 2014, the Danish Research Centre for Manorial Studies launched the Internet portal, www.danskeherregaarde.dk (Danish site). The aim of the website is to create coherent, easy access to knowledge of manor houses in the past and in the present: both for those who want to get a sense of the big picture and for those who want to go into more detail and gain more in-depth knowledge of the subject.

That means that, simply by using this forum, any manor house enthusiast, tourist or planner with an interest will have access to information, for which otherwise they would have to search in many different sources and reference books: for example, Steen Estvad Petersen’s studies, Niels Peter Stilling’s books and the reference work, Danske Slotte og Herregårde from the 1960s.

The project is an extension of the creation of a number of historical maps (Danish site), which present an overview of manor houses in Denmark in 1770, 1850 and 1900.

The work on www.danskeherregaarde.dk and the historical maps is funded by Realdania.

More about manor houses online

In spring of 2017, the Danish Research Centre for Manorial Studies launched a new, thematic website and a database of manor houses in the Central Denmark Region called www.herregaardskortet.dk

In March 2015, at Aarhus University, Danmarkshistorien.dk gave a presentation about Danish manor houses (Danish website), devised in collaboration with the Danish Research Centre for Manorial Studies. The presentation looked at the history of Danish manor houses and included accounts of 14 specific manor houses and illustrative source material.